constitute */*/


constitute */*/
UK [ˈkɒnstɪˌtjuːt] / US [ˈkɑnstɪˌtut] verb
Word forms "constitute":
present tense I/you/we/they constitute he/she/it constitutes present participle constituting past tense constituted past participle constituted formal
1) [linking verb] if several people or things constitute something, they combine to form it

one of the countries that constitute the European Union

2) [linking verb] if something constitutes something else, it is considered to be that thing

This letter does not constitute an offer of employment.

The invasion constitutes a clear violation of our sovereignty.

3) [transitive, usually passive] to formally establish an organization, institution, government etc and give it the authority to operate

English dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • constitute — con·sti·tute / kän stə ˌtüt, ˌtyüt/ vt 1: to appoint to an office or function those who are constituted heirs or named legatees Louisiana Civil Code legal authority constitute s all magistrates 2 …   Law dictionary

  • Constitute — Con sti*tute (k[o^]n st[ict]*t[=u]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Constituted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Constituting}.] [L. constitutus, p. p. of constiture to constitute; con + statuere to place, set, fr. status station, fr. stare to stand. See {Stand}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • constitute — UK US /ˈkɒnstɪtjuːt/ verb [T] ► to be the parts that form something: »Economy travellers constitute about 80% of the airline s business. ► to be something, or to be considered as something: »Giving feedback on individual salespersons always… …   Financial and business terms

  • constitute — mid 15c., verb use of adjective constitute, made up, formed (late 14c.), from L. constitutus arranged, settled, pp. adj. from constituere to cause to stand, set up, fix, place, establish, set in order; form something new; resolve, of persons, to… …   Etymology dictionary

  • constitute — [v1] comprise, form aggregate, complement, complete, compose, compound, construct, cook up*, create, develop, dream up*, embody, enact, establish, fill out, fix, flesh out*, found, frame, fudge together*, incorporate, integrate, make, make up,… …   New thesaurus

  • constitute — [kän′stə to͞ot΄, kän′stətyo͞ot΄] vt. constituted, constituting [ME constituten < L constitutus, pp. of constituere, to set up, establish < com , together + statuere, to set: see STATUE] 1. to set up (a law, government, institution, etc.);… …   English World dictionary

  • Constitute — Con sti*tute (k[o^]n st[ict]*t[=u]t), n. An established law. [Obs.] T. Preston. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • constitute — ► VERB 1) be (a part) of a whole. 2) be or be equivalent to. 3) (usu. be constituted) establish by law. ORIGIN Latin constituere establish, appoint , from statuere set up …   English terms dictionary

  • constitute — transitive verb ( tuted; tuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin constitutus, past participle of constituere to set up, constitute, from com + statuere to set more at statute Date: 15th century 1. to appoint to an office, function, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • constitute — 01. In an election 51% of the vote [constitutes] a majority. 02. It is sometimes difficult to decide what [constitutes] abuse when discussing the discipline of children. 03. The native American population [constitutes] a small but important part… …   Grammatical examples in English


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